What is the “National Diabetes Prevention Program” (DPP) Anyway?

National Diabetes Prevention Program

The National Diabetes Prevention Program, or NDPP, is a nationwide network of organizations aimed at lowering the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in the US. Eligible DPP participants have been diagnosed with prediabetes or display at least 5 of the risk factors identified by the CDC’s Risk Quiz. With access to a health coach and evidence-based lifestyle change programs, participants reduce their risk of diabetes by as much as 58% — or 71% for those 60 years old and older.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates 88 million American adults have prediabetes, and 84% of them are unaware. These individuals are at an increased risk of full-fledged type 2 diabetes, along with developing heart disease or experiencing a stroke. The statistics are staggering and scary — but the disease is 100% preventable. As is the case with most preventable health phenomenons, awareness is key to turning numbers around.

Enter the CDC’s National Diabetes Prevention Program, or NDPP for short.

National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) Overview

The CDC introduced the National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) initiative in 2010. NDPP is essentially a framework that gives Americans access to evidence-based, affordable lifestyle change programs that delay or reverse the onset of type 2 diabetes. Partner organizations in the National DPP network include federal agencies, health professionals, employers, and others in the public and private sectors; and their shared goal is to reduce the prevalence of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes in the United States.

National Diabetes Prevention Program Curriculum & Requirements

The Diabetes Prevention Program is delivered by CDC-recognized providers around the United States. All lifestyle change programs are one year in duration and share the following key elements:

  • Approved content following the CDC’s “PreventT2” curriculum
  • A Lifestyle Coach trained and certified by the Association of Diabetes Care and Education Specialists (ADCES)
  • Tracking of participants’ weight, food intake, physical activity, and coaching sessions attended
  • A designated Program Coordinator to represent each CDC-accredited NDPP provider
  • Standard operating procedures and data submission requirements for Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program (DPRP) providers

Offered both online and in-person, the Diabetes Prevention Program promotes lifestyle changes aimed at preventing diabetes.

As participants progress through a one-year journey, they learn to incorporate physical activity into their daily routine, choose healthier foods, and practice coping skills for healthier stress management. Weight loss is used as the primary measure of success in the program, as losing 5% of your body weight can lower your risk of type 2 diabetes by 58%. However, DPP participants will tell you the impact on their life is far greater than the number they see on the scale.

MDPP vs. NDPP: Medicare & National Diabetes Prevention Program

While researching the Diabetes Prevention Program, you’ll notice a few flavors of abbreviations. We’ve already covered the National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP); its lesser-known sibling is the Medicare DPP, or MDPP, offering. The Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program is simply a variation of the CDC’s behavior change intervention made available to Medicare beneficiaries.

The program requirements are slightly different for MDPP. For example, in addition to the NDPP requirements, individuals must also not have end-stage renal disease (ESRD) to be considered eligible for MDPP; the program also lasts up to 24 months, and you may only participate once in your life.

Do I Qualify for the National Diabetes Prevention Program?

To qualify for a Diabetes Prevention Program referral, you must be at-risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Your diabetes risk increases if you are male, have high blood pressure, have a family history of diabetes, or had diabetes while pregnant. African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanics, American Indians, and Pacific Islanders are also at increased risk, according to the ADA.

You know you’re at risk, and therefore eligible for DPP participation, if any of the following three criteria apply:

  1. In the last year, you’ve had been diagnosed with prediabetes based on a blood test result:
    • Hemoglobin A1C: 5.7–6.4% or
    • Fasting plasma glucose: 100–125 mg/dL or
    • Two-hour plasma glucose (after a 75 gm glucose load): 140–199 mg/dL
  2. You’ve scored “high risk” on the CDC’s Prediabetes Risk Quiz
  3. You were diagnosed with diabetes while pregnant (i.e., gestational diabetes diagnosis)

The program eligibility guidelines also require that individuals:

  • Are overweight as defined by body mass index (minimum BMI of 23 for Asian Americans; BMI of 25+ for all others)
  • Are not pregnant
  • Are at least 18 years of age

Those who have diabetes or were previously diagnosed with diabetes — types 1 or 2 — are not eligible for the Diabetes Prevention Program.

Who Offers the National Diabetes Prevention Program?

Lifestyle Change Programs, a key component of the DPP initiative, are offered throughout the United States — online, in-person, and in combination delivery formats.

The class schedule, size, and cost vary by provider, so search the DPRP registry for a program that meets your needs.

Some of partner organizations may sound familiar to you. The YMCA, Baptist, Florida Blue, and USPM are on the list.

USPM Offers a Free Online Diabetes Prevention Program

USPM is fully recognized as a DPRP provider. We’re proud to deliver the Diabetes Prevention Program to populations throughout the US. If you’re interested in participating, reach out to learn about our DPP offering. As a DPP provider, USPM partners with employers, health insurance payors, and other organizations to make our lifestyle change program available to as many at-risk individuals as possible. In many cases, your participation may be 100% free to you. A representative from our Member Care team would be happy to walk you through a quick questionnaire to determine whether you are eligible for our offering.

USPM's National Diabetes Prevention Program stats
USPM maintains Full Recognition status as Diabetes Prevention Program provider.

Our DPP participants’ health outcomes speak for themselves. Those who actively engage in our Prevent T2 program for at least one year lose an average of more than 7% of their starting body weight — cutting their risk of type 2 diabetes in half and improving their quality of life.

Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program (DPRP) Requirements

The CDC established the Diabetes Prevention Recognition Program Standards. Organizations undergo a rigorous accreditation process to achieve Full Recognition status as a DPRP provider. The CDC requires all DPP providers to submit cohort data every six months to earn and maintain their recognition status; that data is used to evaluate whether the provider “demonstrates effectiveness” by hitting the program targets outlined in the DPRP Standards.

Join the National Diabetes Prevention Program

After participating in USPM’s Prevent T2 program for several months, Elizabeth shared her testimony: “I have lost weight, developed added strength and muscle tone, and more than that I feel stronger and more energetic than I have in years.” As amazing as her story is, it’s not the only one we’ve seen.

Individuals who participate in a CDC-recognized Diabetes Prevention Program have more energy, more stable blood sugar levels, and less stress as they enjoy the benefits of a healthier lifestyle. Take the quiz today — and take the first step toward a healthier you!

Prediabetes: What You Need to Know

Prediabetes and type 2 diabetes

One out of 3 American adults has prediabetes – that’s 86 million people. And, 9 out of 10 of them don’t even know they have it! Prediabetes is a condition that comes before diabetes. It means your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but aren’t high enough to be called diabetes. There are no clear symptoms of prediabetes. Without intervention, many people with prediabetes could develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years.1

Prediabetes

You’re at risk for developing prediabetes if you: 

  • Are overweight
  • Are 45 years or older
  • Have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes
  • Are physically active less than 3 times a week
  • Have ever had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or given birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds
  • Are African American, Hispanic/Latino American, American Indian, or Alaska Native (some Pacific Islanders and Asian Americans are also at higher risk)

Diabetes

You’re at risk for developing type 2 diabetes if you: 

  • Have prediabetes
  • Are overweight
  • Are 45 years or older
  • Have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes
  • Are physically active less than 3 times a week
  • Have ever had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or given birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds
  • Are African American, Hispanic/Latino American, American Indian, or Alaska Native (some Pacific Islanders and Asian Americans are also at higher risk)2

Don’t let the “pre” in prediabetes fool you into thinking it’s not a problem now. By taking action now, you have the power to not only prevent type 2 diabetes but also reduce the risk of heart attacks and stroke associated with prediabetes.

People with prediabetes who do not change their lifestyle by losing weight if needed, and increase their physical activity – can develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. According to the CDC, type 2 diabetes can lead to serious health issues such as:

  • Heart attack
  • Stroke
  • Blindness
  • Kidney failure
  • Loss of toes, feet, or legs

Additionally, being overweight and not physically active can make you feel sluggish and affect your mood. Making positive lifestyle changes can lower your risk of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, and improve the quality of your overall health and wellbeing as well as the wellbeing of your family.3

The great news is that prediabetes can often be reversed. You can join a CDC-recognized diabetes prevention program to help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. This proven lifestyle change program can cut diabetes risk in half. Programs are available in-person or online and are designed for people who have prediabetes or are at risk for type 2 diabetes.

CDC-recognized lifestyle change programs are proven to work and are based on research led by the National Institutes of Health. Their research shows that people with prediabetes who participate in a structured lifestyle change program can cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58% (71% for people over 60 years old). This finding was the result of the program helping people lose 5% to 7% of their body weight through healthier eating and 150 minutes of physical activity a week. For a person who weighs 200 pounds, losing 5% to 7% of their body weight means losing just 10 to 14 pounds. It doesn’t take drastic weight loss to make a big impact.

The impact of this program can last for years to come. Research has found that even after 10 years, people who completed a diabetes prevention program were one third less likely to develop type 2 diabetes.4

How do I find out if I have prediabetes?

Take the American Diabetes Association’s Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test.

What can I learn from the program?

The program is not a fad diet or an exercise class. It’s not a quick fix. It’s a year-long program focused on long-term changes to create healthy habits for life.

Your lifestyle coach, who is specially trained to lead the program, will help you learn new skills, encourage you to set and meet goals, and keep you motivated. A year may sound like a long time, but learning new habits takes time and practice. As you begin eating better and moving more, you’ll notice a difference in how you feel.

During the first half of the program, you will learn to:

  • Eat healthy without giving up the foods you love
  • Add physical activity to your life, even if you think you don’t have time
  • Manage your stress
  • Cope with challenges and obstacles that can derail your path – like how to eat healthy when traveling
  • Get back on track if you stray from your plan

In the second half of the program, you will enhance the skills you’ve learned so you can maintain the changes you’ve made. These sessions will review key ideas such as tracking your food and physical activity, setting goals, staying motivated, and overcoming barriers.

Where can I find a program?

CDC-recognized lifestyle programs are located in a variety of places throughout the community, including:

  • Health care clinics
  • Community-based organizations
  • Faith-based organizations
  • Pharmacies
  • Wellness centers
  • Worksites
  • Cooperative extension offices
  • University-based continuing education programs
  • You can also choose an online program

To find a program near you visit, https://nccd.cdc.gov/DDT_DPRP/Programs.aspx

What’s the cost of the program?

The cost of participating in a CDC-recognized lifestyle change program varies, depending on location, organization offering it, and type of program (in person or online). Contact the program you are interested in to find out the cost. Some employers and insurance carriers cover the cost of these programs. Check with your employer or insurance carrier to see if a program is covered.

USPM is Proud to Offer the Diabetes Prevention Program

USPM is a fully recognized provider of the National Diabetes Prevention Program led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This clinically proven program helps people who are at risk for type 2 diabetes make achievable and realistic lifestyle changes — reducing their risk by up to 38%. For more information on this offering, contact us and choose the option to learn more about the Diabetes Prevention Program.

References

  1. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/prediabetes-type2/index.html
  2. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/basics/risk-factors.html
  3. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/prediabetes-type2/index.html
  4. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/prediabetes-type2/preventing.html

Diabetes: Prediabetes, Risks, and Prevention

Diabetes: Prediabetes, Risks, and Prevention

Did you know that more than 29 million Americans are living with diabetes? There are 1.4 million new cases each year alone in the U.S. In addition, 86 million Americans are living with prediabetes, the stage just before diabetes when not all the symptoms are present that warrant a diagnosis.1

What Are the Risk Factors?


Diabetes Facts and Statistics

  • Age: As we age we are more at risk for developing diabetes. Specifically, being over the age of 45 puts you at higher risk.
  • Weight: Being overweight can put you at risk for diabetes. The more fat we have in our bodies the more resistant our cells are to insulin, a hormone produced by our pancreas.
  • Family History: Has anyone in your immediate family (mother, father, sister or brother) been diagnosed with diabetes?
  • Race: Diabetes occurs more often in individuals who are African-American, Asian-American, Hispanic/Latino-American, and Pacific Islander backgrounds.
  • Physical Inactivity: Exercising less than 3 days a week can put you at risk.
  • History of Gestational Diabetes: Were you ever diagnosed with diabetes during pregnancy? Or had a baby who weighed 9 pounds or more?
  • High Blood Pressure: Have you been told that you have high blood pressure, a reading of 140/90 or higher?
  • Low HDL Cholesterol: Is your “good” cholesterol less than 35 mg/dL?
  • Abnormal Triglyceride Levels: Triglycerides are a type of fat in the blood stream. Levels of triglycerides above 250 mg/dL can put you at increased risk.

Are You at Risk?

To find out if you are at risk for type 2 diabetes, complete the Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test on American Diabetes Association website.

There are several ways to diagnose diabetes. Each way usually needs to be repeated on a second day to diagnose diabetes. Testing of your blood glucose levels should be carried out in a health care setting (such as your doctor’s office or a lab) and you should follow the advice and instructions of your health care professional.

What is Prediabetes?

Prediabetes is a condition that can lead to type 2 diabetes and heart disease. When you have prediabetes, your blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal but are not high enough to be called diabetes. Diabetes can lead to many health problems, so it’s better to prevent it in the first place. You can take steps to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and heart disease.3

How Can You Prevent or Delay Diabetes?

You can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes from developing by:

  • Cutting back on calories and saturated fat.
  • Losing weight.
  • Increasing your daily physical activity.4

If you’re overweight, losing 7% of your total weight can help you a lot. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, your goal would be to lose 14 pounds.

How Do You Decide What to Do?

You don’t have to make big changes. Small steps can add up to big results. Talk with your health care team to make a plan. Always consult with a health care professional before starting any exercise program. A good goal for most people is:

  • Walking briskly for at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week.
  • Being more active throughout the day by parking further from the store, or taking the stairs.

Make a plan to eat less fat and calories. You can meet with a dietitian to talk about what to eat and how to lose weight. You might try:

  • Starting each dinner with a salad of leafy greens. Salad provides nutrients and fills you up. Then you might eat less of any high-calorie foods that might come later.
  • Switching from regular soda and juice to no-calorie water.

Visit diabetes.org/prediabetes to learn more about managing your prediabetes. For recipes and meal planning, visit Recipes for Healthy Living

References:

  1. http://www.diabetes.org/
  2. http://main.diabetes.org/dorg/adm/adm-2016-fact-sheet.pdf
  3. http://www.diabetes.org/are-you-at-risk/prediabetes/
  4. http://professional.diabetes.org/sites/professional.diabetes.org/files/media/All_About_Prediabetes.pdf